Wednesday, 17 March 2010

You are here

There is a little black spot at the bottom of the main white panel that tells you where you are but try as I might I can not see those two circles with 90 in or the arrows.
According to this chart Heyford Station is 75 meters and 20 ch from somewhere, but where?


Surely the abbreviation for miles is ml or mls. If ch is the abbreviation for ‘chain’ then 20 chain is 440 yards so given that 440 yards is a quarter of a mile shouldn’t it have said 75 1/4 miles or 75.25 mls, so much more understandable. I wonder which moron at Network rail is responsible for this signage.

7 comments:

Janys said...

"chain (ch)
a unit of distance used or formerly used by surveyors. Although the unit is not often used today, measured distance along a road or railroad is commonly called chainage regardless of the units used. The traditional British surveyor's chain, also called Gunter's chain because it was introduced by the English mathematician Edmund Gunter (1581-1626) in 1620, is 4 rods [1] long: that's equal to exactly 1/80 mile, 1/10 furlong, 22 yards, or 66 feet (20.1168 meters). The traditional length of a cricket pitch is 1 chain. Gunter's chain has the useful property that an acre is exactly 10 square chains. The chain was divided into 100 links. American surveyors sometimes used a longer chain of 100 feet, known as the engineer's chain or Ramsden's chain. (However, Gunter's chain is also used in the U.S.; in fact, it is an important unit in the Public Lands Survey System.) In Texas, the vara chain of 2 varas (55.556 ft) was used in surveying Spanish land grants. In the metric world, surveyors often use a chain of 20 meters (65.617 ft). See also shackle and shot [2] for anchor chain lengths."

Picked this up from:
http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictC.html

though I agree it doesn't solve the moron problem at Network rail...

Fred said...

Hardly a moron, miles and chains is the standard measurement for track distances and has been for a long time...

Janys said...

Fred... "moron" was Maffi's term, not mine!
LOL

Tom Jones said...

I think the lines with the arrowheads and circles refer the the track. The 90 is probably the maximum speed of the track at this point.
Two tracks usually have an UP and a DOWN line. The Down goes in the direction of the major location. My guess is London (but then I'm in Australia so you might know better)

Maffi said...

There are two things wrong with this sign that aren't immediately apparent, It is nearly five foot wide and it is in the wrong place. It could be half the size and so less objectionable. Yes it is obviously a sign for track workers and as such could be mounted on or just beyond the entrance gate which is off to the right.

This being a cutesy rural station such signs are not necessary when Jo Public goes to the station, they are just a 'blot on the landscape'.

Even I managed to work out what it all meant. the 90 speed limit, the up and down lines, 'ch' etc. etc. etc.

Can we stop now?

If you would like to comment on why the pic is out of focus when the original picture isn't then do please continue.

Martin said...

I thought the focus problem was curious, but I can't offer an explanation. Now I know again how long a chain is, wonder how long I'll remember it for this time....??

Halfie said...

Tom, I thought you always went up to London and down from it.