Tuesday, 21 August 2012

Bridge Tales

nb SAM just came through the bridge heading north. (you may remember Sam he ties his centre line across the busy towpath). I’m not quite sure why he felt the need to get off his boat while it was turning pulling the back round, but as he passed me he said, ”Where ever there is a tight turn you will always find a BW boat moored in the wrong place”. The truth of the matter is that wherever there is a tight turn boaters will always blame someone else for screwing it up.

Well I am at a loss because despite my assumption that he was a novice after his last cock-up I have since found out that he is quite experienced (oh yeah) yes. He been boating for ages, been all around apparently.

Now it’s about 140 feet from the bridge to the far bank. With a BW boat moored there, that’s 133 feet. I fail to see how a boater, an experienced boater, cannot get a 70 foot boat around that corner with all that space. I have seen a hotel pair come around there and they performed such a fantastic piece of boating ballet, they both ended up moored breasted up on the water point. Agreed they are experts.

I have heard 50 footers complain about that BW boat. Only last week a 55 footer who had cocked up his approach, berated a elderly boater for being in the way, when he was so out of position he might have well stopped in the car park. Does no one ever plan their manoeuvres? I mean why not moor up, go and have a look at what is coming up, pace it out if necessary and have a plan before you or your boat gets in a pickle.
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Part of the problem is a mis-understanding of the meaning of this sign. Yes it does mean NO MOORING, but it is aimed at the boater looking for somewhere to stop. You see, this is an official BW (now CRT) mooring for BW workboats. It has been for many years. Thrupp use to have the BW worksyard here and they had several yards of mooring here for maintenance boats. The yard is now Annie’s tea rooms, but the mooring still exists. What the sign is telling you is that you cannot moor there because it is a workboat mooring. Treat it like a reserved parking bay. The same applies to the next post down and the one after that except that between posts two and three the mooring is private and PAID FOR!
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It’s for the mooring of hire boats and these can be moored two abreast. There is still more than enough room to turn after the bridge with these boat moored here it just takes a bit of planning, use that dormant brain you have been storing for the last few years. Don’t blame your lack of skill/thought on BW.
I have been through over two thousand locks, but I still approach new, to me, locks without a windlass to have a look, new moveable bridges the same.

If you are correctly positioned, at the Thrupp Lift bridge, on the right side of the canal you can angle your boat through the bridge hole right to left so you have already started the turn. Then as you exit the bridge, tiller hard over and the biggest of boats will go round easily. Even if you go through the bridge straight start to turn as your head comes under the bridge. And before you mention the ‘rubbing strakes’, they are designed to be rubbed.
DSCF4903 Don’t put a monetary value on them they are there to protect your hull and paint work. They are sacrificial just like your anodes. Most people don’t keep a boat long enough to wear them out and that is part of boating anyway.

6 comments:

MortimerBones said...

I suppose that as long as the boat turns it doesn't really matter. I think people think they have to get around in one go. Yes, it is nice if one can and there is no reason not to but from my years of observation it is easy not to too.

That is the good thing about boating, it doesn't matter if it goes wrong as long as it goes right in the end and doesn't cause any damage. Damaging ones pride in the process is probably medicinally good.

MortimerBones said...

I suppose that as long as the boat turns it doesn't really matter. I think people think they have to get around in one go. Yes, it is nice if one can and there is no reason not to but from my years of observation it is easy not to too.

That is the good thing about boating, it doesn't matter if it goes wrong as long as it goes right in the end and doesn't cause any damage. Damaging ones pride in the process is probably medicinally good.

Anonymous said...

Hi Maffi- The google pic of 'Milly at the wide' (earlier post) illustrates this 'WIDE' space very clearly. Surely it's a piece of wee wee to get round with that much space? Is this chap hiding a problem about his capabilities of moving the tiller, perhaps physical? Surely? If so, even more reason to be prepared. His tag line picture (excuse the pun) of the ropes across the towpath at the top of your blog is a classic! I thought you had staged managed that for a laugh. I now assume even your wicked sense of humour did not stretch to that as a practical joke. With respect, the old fella must be really struggling? Did you not go down the educational route & provide some insight, or just stand with your gob open?
Kevin Ronnie

Allan said...

Here, Here , a little more thought and planning before hand and a lot less drive on and be dammed. Then they would not be in the position that they put themselves. Think before you sink, and stop moaning about what others have done or are doing, you just do what you’re doing and make the best of it. Don’t blame others because you miss navigated.

Maffi said...

I took that picture last year Ronnie its not him.

The Grumpy Porter said...

Bones you are so right more of us need to get your relaxed attitude its so refreshing